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Effect of geotextile and agrotextile covering on productivity and nutritional values in lettuce

Ivana Tosic1*, Milan Mirosavljevic2, Novo Przulj3, Vojislav Trkulja1, Dusica Pesevic4, and Jelena Barbir5

In order to optimize the lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) production in greenhouses and to evaluate how a usage of mulching and covering plants with woven agrotextile affects its yields, N content, nitrate, Zn and vitamin C in lettuce leaves, a 2-yr experiment was established. In the experiments, black and white plastic foils were used for mulching before planting, and woven agrotextile for plant covering after planting. The effect of each, as well as combination of them, on lettuce growth and productivity was evaluated. The experiment involved six treatments: control (without mulch), polyethylene black plastic mulch, polyethylene white plastic mulch, polyethylene black plastic mulch and woven agrotextile, polyethylene white plastic mulch and woven agrotextile, and woven agrotextile. In the first growing season the yield was 23% higher when polyethylene black plastic mulch was used compared to the control. In the second growing season the yield was 29% higher when polyethylene black plastic mulch was used compared to the control. Nitrogen content decreased 9% when the woven agrotextile was used compared to the control. Polyethylene black plastic mulch and polyethylene black plastic mulch with agrotextile reduced Zn content compared to the control. Vitamin C content increased 21% when woven agrotextile was used compared to the control. The overall effect of mulching and covering plants with woven agrotextile showed positive effect on lettuce production. The results obtained could assist lettuce growers in selecting most effective production technologies in order to achieve highest yield and nutritional value in this crop.

Key words: Lettuce, nitrate, nitrogen, plastic mulch, vitamin C, zinc, woven agrotextile.

1Agricultural Institute of Republic of Srpska, 78000 Banja Luka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
*Corresponding author (it.tosic@gmail.com).
2Institute for Field and Vegetable Crops, 21000 Novi Sad, Serbia.
3University of Banja Luka, Faculty of Agriculture, 78000 Banja Luka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
4University of Banja Luka, Faculty of Natural Sciences and Mathematics, 78000 Banjaluka, RS, Bosnia and Herzegovina.
5Hamburg University of Applied Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, 21033 Hamburg, Germany.

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